PRESS RELEASE

Appraisers for CoreLogic Sue for Unpaid Wages

February 6, 2018, Oakland – An Appraiser working for CoreLogic Solutions LLC has filed a class and collective action suit against CoreLogic on behalf of herself and others, seeking to recover millions of dollars in unpaid wages. The lawsuit, filed in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California, claims CoreLogic is failing to include Appraisers’ incentive pay in its computation of the regular rate for the purposes of calculating Appraisers’ overtime pay. Moreover, the suit alleges CoreLogic has been applying a cryptic incentive compensation scheme that reduces Appraisers’ incentive pay when they claim their overtime.

Appraisers—the heart of CoreLogic’s valuations services—typically work far more than forty hours each week, and the law requires CoreLogic to pay them at a rate of not less than one and one-half times their regular rate of pay for those hours. Under the law, the regular rate must reflect all payments from a performance period, and Appraisers, who are all paid an hourly wage plus a monthly nondiscretionary incentive each period, are entitled to overtime pay based on a regular rate that reflects the total of those payments.

“It appears CoreLogic has been regularly short-changing its Appraisers,” says lead Plaintiff’s counsel Bryan Schwartz, of Bryan Schwartz Law.

As lead Plaintiff Harriett Mitchell, states: “Things just don’t add up.”

In addition to miscalculating Appraisers’ regular rates, the suit claims that CoreLogic has also been applying an “efficiency” formula that skims off overtime pay at the end of each Appraiser’s performance period. CoreLogic places overtime hours in the denominator of its incentive calculation formula such that the incentive compensation decreases as the total hours worked increases. As such, the formula rewards appraisers for underreporting their overtime.

Bryan Schwartz Law  has represented thousands of appraisers nationwide, recovering tens of millions of dollars in unpaid wages in recent years from Bank of America and other major players in the real estate valuation business. 

“Enough is enough,” proclaims Ms. Mitchell. “The more I work, the less I get paid, and this doesn’t make sense. It’s time for CoreLogic to be up front about how its paying us, and to follow the law.” Numerous colleagues have already joined Mitchell’s suit

For more information about this case, Mitchell v. CoreLogic, Inc. (No. 8:17-cv-02274), please contact Bryan Schwartz at Bryan@BryanSchwartzLaw.com.